I recently answered a question, and the user said I answered correctly, but then edited the question.

Should I encourage the user to ask a new question? Or do you think they just made a mistake early on? And if they did make a mistake, should I then try to correct my answer?

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related: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/43478/… –  Wooble May 12 at 13:25
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@Wooble this has been "ported" to MSO: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/253762/… –  gnat May 12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Any fundamental changes to a question that change it enough to invalidate correct answers are a no go. As the OP states in revision 5

The previous question body basically was about "how to drag and drop contour texture on surface after making it in photoshop etc..". Now it asks about how to programatically generating contour on a surface on the basis of data.

That is too much of a fundamental shift to be appropriate in my opinion. I would not hold it against you if you were to roll hat question back to its original.

Perhaps it is what the OP meant to ask all along, but he didn't. He asked the original question, you answered it and to the OP's own admission did so correctly. So he should simply ask a new question.

Given that you're currently the only user who answered, if you are willing to update your answer to the new question you can choose to do so instead. But be careful that you don't fall into the trap of a help vampire who'll change the question to whatever he fancies next.

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I've already commented on the post trying to find the true intent... Once I find that, I will update my answer, and make a note similar to @la-comadreja 's suggestion, then I will tell the user that in the future they should ask two seperate questions or be more clear. –  Outlaw Lemur May 12 at 13:46
    
+1. Plus an excuse to post a link to the help vampire diagram :D –  durron597 May 12 at 14:10

Encouraging the user to ask a new question is a good idea. That way, future Users of the site can see both versions of the question in their searches. The person who asked the question should not fundamentally change it to delete the original content—although a good-faith edit, in practice its effect on the content of the site is similar to vandalism that destroys the content of the original post.

If you have the tools, you should rollback and next best is to flag the question with a comment that important content was deleted in a revision.

In the meantime, you can also leave a comment on your answer, or edit your answer, to mention what the previous question was. Then, if you know how to answer the new question, write a new answer targeted to the new question.

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