I have used Stack Overflow for two years now and posted questions sporadically, but I found it is always the most prominent and most professional website for technical questions in the area of computer science. As I'm currently working on scalable systems topics, I'm using (up to now) the following Stack Exchange websites:

  • Stack Overflow
  • Server Fault
  • Database Administrators
  • Ask Ubuntu
  • Computer Science
  • TeX - LaTeX

I observe that the distribution of topics from Stack Overflow to a multitude of websites has some significant drawbacks:

  1. Since reputation is not shared over websites, it is hard for newbies like me to really contribute to discussions. I recently had the situation that I wanted to improve an existing solution, but I was neither able to edit the solution nor even to add a comment. (*)

  2. My first questions - like two years ago - were often answered extremely quickly and discussions were inspiring. Now being forced to ask questions on different websites - as questions get down-votes if they are off-topic - lots of questions do not get attention, meaning that there are no answers and also no discussions.

In my experience I believe that both aspects relate to each other leading to a decline of user activity and a shrinkage of the Stack Overflow community.

(*) In my example, I often have the situation that I find a question that is similar to mine. I do some research or experiments and sometimes find some aspects that were missing in the marked solution. Then I'm not able to leave a comment because of missing reputation on that particular website despite I have some reputation on related Stack Exchange websites. This is a loss of information and is a decrease of user activity only because of formal aspects.

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marked as duplicate by gnat, Martijn Pieters, IronMan84, vba4all, rene yesterday

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"In my experience I believe that both aspects relate to each other leading to a decline of user activities and a shrinkage of the Stack Overflow community" ... are we talking "gut feeling" or "hard fact" here? If the latter, show it. –  Bart May 7 at 8:10
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None of the sites you listed host discussions. Also there is no rep requirement for editing. –  Mat May 7 at 8:15
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If I posted the question in the wrong forum.. SE is NOT a forum! –  rene May 7 at 8:19
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Please note that here on Meta, downvotes don't just reflect question quality, they're also used to express disagreement. –  Cupcake May 7 at 8:39
    
Thanks. I clarified the term discussion as this was meant to be the entirety of comments to questions and answers, asking for background information, pointing towards possible solutions, alternative solutions or completely new aspects. –  sema May 7 at 8:39
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@rene In this question I describe a personal view and get comments to that. This exactly what a forum is: [oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/forum?q=forum] –  sema May 7 at 8:40
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Since reputation is not shared over websites, it is hard for newbies as me to really contribute to discussions. This is already addressed. When you reach a certain rep level in any Stack Exchange site, you get "account association" bonuses of 100 rep on each of your other Stack Exchange sites as well, which will allow you to do things such as upvote, comment, and edit. I think you need at least 200 rep in one site first though. –  Cupcake May 7 at 8:43
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@sema Yeah, you're perfectly right. –  rene May 7 at 8:43
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Also, Stack Overflow is very much not like a forum in the traditional (web) sense. It was very much designed to be the exact opposite of a forum, in fact, an Anti-Forum. See Civilized Discourse Construction Kit. –  Cupcake May 7 at 8:44
    
@Cupcake Thanks,I didn't know that. Would you be willing to add this as an answer? I haven't found any similar question and I think this is a profound answer to point (1) of my question. –  sema May 7 at 8:53
    
@sema I'm going to bed, I'll leave my comment so that someone else can come along as add it as an answer, or you can answer yourself if you want :) –  Cupcake May 7 at 8:57
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The Stack Overflow community has been nothing but growing. The problem is content quality - and I don't see how throwing all these areas together might solve that –  Pekka 웃 May 7 at 12:56
    
See also: Does it pay to spin off sites? –  Fish Below the Ice Sep 29 at 19:17
    
I have a little difficulty with your use of "In my experience", seeing how in 4+ years here you've barely managed to earn 200 rep combined from all the sites you've registered on. Perhaps more time actually participating here would give you more actual experience, and it might become more clear to you why all of the work has been done over the last few years to create the other sites in the SE network specifically to stop all of them from being posted on SO. "I'm a new user, and I want to dump all of my questions on the main site instead of finding the proper place" isn't a good idea. –  Ken White Sep 29 at 22:03

2 Answers 2

Since reputation is not shared over websites, it is hard for newbies as me to really contribute to discussions. I recently had the situation that I wanted to improve an existing solution, but was neither able to edit the solution nor even to add comment.

If you get to 200 reputation on any Stack Exchange site, you'll be given a 100 point bonus on every other SE site where your accounts are associated. This will give you the ability to comment on any site. You are already able to suggest an edit anywhere.

In my example, I have often the situation that I find a question that is similar to mine. I do some research or experiments and sometimes find some aspects that were missing in the marked solution. Then I'm not able to leave a comment because of missing reputation on that particular website despite I have some reputation on related Stack Exchange websites. This is a loss of information and is a decrease of user activity only because of formal aspects.

Don't leave a comment in that situation, leave an answer of your own.

It's ok for Stack Overflow to shrink a little bit if it means that other communities grow. If someone is an expert in Database Administration, Server Administration, Unix & Linux, Ubuntu, etc., then they should be contributing on those sites that focus on their area of expertise, not a site dedicated to programming. If you have a question in one of those topics, you want to ask it to a group of experts in that subject, not to a bunch of programmers who might include an expert or two.

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"Don't leave a comment in that situation, leave an answer of your own." I disagree that a new answer is a good approach in that situation because it's a comment to the answer and giving a new answer would mean to copy the respective answer and adding only a single note. –  sema May 7 at 16:26
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"If you have a question in one of those topics, you want to ask it to a group of experts in that subject, not to a bunch of programmers who might include an expert or two." I agree with you that this is desirable. However, as I said it seems that questions are "starving" which would maybe not be the case if people contribute with ideas and hints from their experience even if they are not experts. Maybe my impression is wrong and I would be fine with your answer. It might be interesting to see some statistics about the evolution of Stack Overflow. –  sema May 7 at 16:32
    
It's ok for Stack Overflow to shrink a little bit if it means that other communities grow...If you have a question in one of those topics, you want to ask it to a group of experts in that subject, not to a bunch of programmers who might include an expert or two. Maybe it's time to split Stack Overflow up into a bunch of smaller Stack Exchange instances on a per tag basis, like "JavaScript Stack Exchange", ".NET Stack Exchange", "Ruby Stack Exchange", and etc.? –  Cupcake May 7 at 22:11
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@Cupcake I doubt that will happen. Most programmers know multiple programming languages, so it's reasonable to assume that many of the experts in JavaScript will also be able to answer questions in .NET or Ruby. While it's not totally unreasonable to think that some programmers will also be able to answer sysadmin or IT security questions, it is less likely. –  Bill the Lizard May 7 at 23:14

I would favor to just recognize two different aspects of points/abilites/rights whatever as I posted here: Why is the point system not separated from the rights issues on different stackexchange sites?

If one has some reputation somewhere else he does not only have those points, e.g. 10K whatever. But he also has some kind of "rights" or "proven abilities" with it. E.g. beeing able to seriously comment, edit and so on.

As a reader I can currently clearly see, how many points some answerer/commenter has which may be a hint of how experienced he is in the area of expertise. So they could be different on the various sites.

But to not scare of "trusted" members on one site we should hang the barrier much lower, to encourage them to participate with high quality and no "artificial" obstacles on other sites on the other hand.

I mean here we deal with programmers, db/system administrators or general IT-folks mostly(!). A lot know a little, but enough from everything and many are able to quickly go to the details with debugging, googleing and so on. I would normally not consider myself an "expert" in many IT-things I do, because in the real world, to be an expert with a tool, means often you have some years of experience with it, have certifications and so on. In the programming world this paradigm can't hold. You have thousands of options to go for a solution (Java, PHP, Bash, Perl, PL/SQL ... whatever). If you are experienced in one, you know the others in a way. If you know a lot about one language in certain areas and quite some depth, there is still the rest of the iceberg that you now little about. It doesn't matter and you could be still considered an expert in a way or the other.

At the end we need to solve problems or find solutions quick, efficient, effective and hopefully with a lot of fun.

So please encourage fun and lessen frustration!

(Let the point-collectors have fun, but please don't force people into the stackexchange "value system" where the real-world values may be somewhere else.)

update: so 200 points to be able to edit everywhere is much too high ... even I don't have it right now although I was fairly active for somebody not interested in getting points.

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here some answers are given where supposedly experience showed some downsides I can't see with my suggestions above: meta.stackexchange.com/a/214174 –  Andreas Dietrich Sep 29 at 14:39

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