I am new here and I am trying to get better at writing my questions.

Looking at the few questions I have written so far, I notice that they are all kind of long — as in several paragraphs with newlines and code. I try to edit them to be concise as possible, but always feel like I need to give more information. I also notice that they go through voting point wars: +1 -1 -1 -1 +1 -1 …etc.

Obviously it is most beneficial not to write things that annoy people, and it is much easier for me to operate thinking about what I can do and not what I shouldn't do.

What are the circumstances under which you think it is okay for a question to be 4 - 5 paragraphs or longer?

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One thing to note is that Stack Overflow is allergic to multiple questions in one. The community still is largely motivated by the overarching goal of building a canonical archive of questions and answers, with one question each. Other than that, I think you're in good shape (as far as I can judge). Don't sweat downvotes on Meta btw; they are often used to express disagreement. –  Pekka 웃 Apr 26 at 4:24
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More generally, the goal of building an archive "for the ages" influences a lot of what is considered a "good fit" question on the site - be succinct; keep to a minimum "personal" stuff like "hi", "thanks", "so I was just returning from my break when I realized..." etc. - not because we're sociopaths (well... at least not necessarily!) but because each Q&A is meant to be read by future generations, and anything beyond the core question is regarded as a distraction. –  Pekka 웃 Apr 26 at 4:30
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I think what you need to ask yourself if you're at that point is "Why is this question so long? Is there something I can do to narrow the scope and make it more succinct?". Rarely is an answerable question (in terms of the format expected here on SO) that long. –  Brian Roach Apr 26 at 5:37
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A question needs to be long enough to cover the subject and short enough to keep it interesting. –  CommonsWare Apr 26 at 21:34
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None of your questions are big enough to force me to scroll the browser. That's not too long. A good way to avoid votes (down and up) is to force the SO user to have to scroll back to get to the button :) –  Hans Passant Apr 26 at 21:35
    
@Hans,thank you for taking the time to check my questions. –  Chris Marie Apr 26 at 22:00
    
@Pekka, if you combine your comments as an answer, I would like to accept it as the answer to my question. If not, I will do it but you won't get the point credit. –  Chris Marie Apr 26 at 22:03
    
Yeah, those should really be an answer. Done. –  Pekka 웃 Apr 26 at 23:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 46 down vote accepted

One thing to note is that Stack Overflow is allergic to multiple questions in one. The community still is largely motivated by the overarching goal of building a canonical archive of questions and answers, with one question each.

Other than that, I think you're in good shape (as far as I can judge).

As a general rule, the goal of building an archive "for the ages" influences a lot of what is considered a "good fit" question on the site - be succinct; keep to a minimum "personal" stuff like "hi", "thanks", "so I was just returning from my break when I realized..." etc. - not because we're sociopaths (well... at least not necessarily!) but because each Q&A is meant to be read by future generations, and anything beyond the core question is regarded as a distraction.

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Questions should be precisely the length that is required to clearly communicate the problem and no longer (or shorter).

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My thoughts exactly. –  Robert Harvey Apr 26 at 22:09
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-1 - in theory it's exactly right, but I doubt it's useful. We all have different definitions of what it means to clearly communicate something. I doubt anyone's ever thought "this doesn't clearly communicate what I'm trying to do, but hey, I'm sure someone will figure it out" or "these details aren't relevant to my question at all, but I'll just leave them here anyway". –  Dukeling Apr 27 at 15:45
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-1. This is a smug truism, and isn't helpful. –  AAA Apr 27 at 16:15
    
And answer should be helpful in any way … –  Amin Negm-Awad Apr 27 at 17:53
    
You can build yourself a helpful answer out of this answer, but it takes some work. By extrapolation, we can get helpful rules of thumb like: "If a sentence isn't adding clarity to my question, it should be removed", and "If I remove this sentence, will the audience need to extrapolate to work out this detail themselves?". –  Beejamin May 22 at 13:50

It's appropriate when it's a good question.

I think that sums it up. A question is good when it's a clear question that's on topic at StackOverflow, shows research effort, gives the right information for people to answer it - in short, when it meets all guidelines in the help center.

Sometimes it takes a lot of text to explain why you finally decided to post a question, which paths you took to no avail (so answerers won't retry these) or the research you did (so answerers won't throw useless links at you). I've actually learned a lot from such questions. (Here's an example).

Looking at your questions I don't think they're exceptionally long. I can't judge whether they're good, but at least they don't look obviously bad.

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As already mentioned, your questions don't really seem too long. However, it's always good to try to understand the reasoning behind any edits made on your post, such as icktoofay's edit on this question, and to take these to heart if they make sense (which should be most of the time if the edit was by a high-reputation (e.g. 10k+) user). And also to look at other's posts (preferably questions, with regard to you asking questions, but answers can help too) - check how easy it is to read, and then try to understand why it was easy / difficult to read, and what would've made it easier to read.

Here are some generic suggestions:

  • It should be readable

    Don't have any single paragraphs that are too long - split them up (in a way that makes sense) if you do.

    If you have a lot of text, consider splitting it into different sections, each with a title.

    Use titles, block quote, code sample, bold, italic, bullet points, numbering and horizontal lines if appropriate. I personally find it difficult to work my way through a long question that has none of these (although there are exceptions).

    Some people post a "TL;DR" (too long, didn't read) section, which briefly summarizes the question, but I don't feel that this is good practice (although there may be exceptions), as one or more of these are usually true:

    • All the details are so relevant that one can't make such a section

    • There is lots of unnecessary information in the question

    • One can write the question in such a way that what could've been put into such a section naturally finds it way to either the top or the bottom of the post, or stands out sufficiently.

    If you feel the need to post a "TL;DR" section, keep the above in mind.

  • It should contain nothing but the bare essentials

    We don't need to know the back story (unless it's necessary to answer the question).

    With regard to telling us why you want to do what you're trying to do - it's difficult to judge how much information is necessary - I've seen hopelessly too many questions on both side of the spectrum - some are prime examples of the XY problem - not nearly enough information regarding 'why' to even begin to answer the question, while others have so much information here that most people probably give up before they get to the end.

    If you're not sure whether something is required to answer the question, separating the text into sections help a lot - you could post it anyway and people can just skip the non-relevant parts (although you should still have strong reason to believe something is required before including it).

    Also keep in mind that you're not having a conversation. It's difficult to explain exactly what I mean by this. It has to do with the flow of the post. When you're having a conversation, one tends to add things like "So, my question is", "Which leads me to" and "additionally" to link parts together - these aren't really necessary here, although they have their place. A bit of lack of flow between parts is fine (but not too much). Take this post for example - bullet points is a prime example of breaking flow - there's nothing like "and another thing you should keep in mind" - the previous point simply stops and another begins.

    Don't take just posting the bare essentials too far though - you should always show any and all of these which are relevant:

  • Don't try to explain things instead of just posting them

    Don't try to explain what an image looks like when you could just post the actual image.

    Don't try to explain what your code looks like (yes, I've seen people do this) when you could just post the actual code.

    And absolutely don't do both (explaining what it looks like and posting it).

    Although, at the same time, don't omit an explanation altogether. You shouldn't explain what it looks like, but you should explain why it looks the way it does, what it means or how it works (if necessary).

  • Stick to a single question (as already mentioned in another answer)

    Building on the bare essentials point - if the flow has broken completely / too much, you should ask yourself whether you shouldn't separate this into multiple questions.

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I think it is fine to ask long questions, as long as it does not cause much unnecessary reading.


This can often be achieved with a structure that allows people to determine quickly whether they can answer the question or not.

Example to maximizes reading:

  • I have written some code to do A, B, C etc.
  • Here is the code (100 lines of code)
  • Now I am trying to debug, but I can't find the appropriate window

Example to minimize reading:

  • Very compact summary of what you want to do and clear description of how this fails
  • Minimal relevant code, including a more elaborate explanation of what you are trying to do and everything else you thing is relevant (examples,...)
  • Explanation of the things you already tried

Make sure to use proper layout (I prefer headers) so people can easily see that they just need to read those first few lines to estimate whether they can answer the question.

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