I would like to know whether there is a community on Stack where I am able to ask a question on understanding problems.

Let's say I am going through a documentation or I am reading a tutorial on a blog, but I don't understand it properly. Like when I have several lines of code I don't understand, which are obviously too complex for me and where I might need some help of explanation.

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I think that this would be better asked on Meta Stack Exchange, but I'm reluctant to migrate as it's not very clear. –  ChrisF Apr 24 at 14:53
    
The first sentence seems a little vague, perhaps this question can be reworded a little. –  Travis J Apr 24 at 14:54
    
Yes, it might be a little vague but English is not my mother tongue I am sorry. I tried to explain what I meant in the following sentences a bit more :/ –  Ibrahim Apachi Apr 24 at 14:57
    
If I understand what you are saying correctly, Stack Overflow would be the right site for that question. As long as it's a specific piece of code, or a specific concept (not "Teach me OOP", or "Explain the codebase of Linux", but rather "What does the author mean referring to encapsulation here?" and "How do these five lines of code work?") you should be fine. –  Linuxios Apr 24 at 15:02
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"How do these five lines of code work" is a really bad title and would probably subject the question to closure. Ask instead about a specific concept. If you don't know enough to know what specifics to ask, the question is too broad for Stack Overflow. –  George Stocker Apr 24 at 15:05
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

These type of questions belong to Stack Overflow, as long as you:

  • Put relevant code in the question
  • Describe precisely what you don't understand
  • Make it very specific
  • Make it relevant for others

If you can't meet these requirements, a question will be pretty much always off-topic for any Stack Exchange site. The only place you might get some luck then is in the Chat rooms.

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Okay thank you very much :) –  Ibrahim Apachi Apr 25 at 5:57

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