A few years ago, I asked a question about the differences between two competing Python libraries. The answer to the question, which detailed 10 or so differences received 84 upvotes along with the question. Unfortunately, the question was closed without explanation and is now on track to being deleted without explanation.

Also, someone since posted a heavily-upvoted comment saying that the question was very constructive and criticizing its closing. Instead of replying to the comment, a moderator decided to delete that comment. This is indefensibly unprofessional.

Given the unique factual rather than discussional answer, would most people consider the question not to be constructive?

What is the point of deleting questions versus closing them? Even if it's not what's happening, deleting comes across as eliminating a magnet for moderator criticism. How can that image be prevented?

Heavily upvoted questions have attracted a lot of attention and are demonstrably useful to many people. When these questions are closed or deleted, it incites criticism of moderation. This can be avoided by having the close-voters explain their reasoning in comments. It is not enough to explain the site rules somewhere because it's not obvious to everyone how the site rules apply to such questions. Yes, it is more work for overworked moderators, but there is always a balance between doing a good job and making it clear to people that you are doing a good job. It also establishes trust.

Should there be a requirement to explain why a particular question is voted to be closed or deleted if the question has a given number of upvotes?

share
6  
There was an explanation: closed as not constructive. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 21 at 14:12
1  
@MartijnPieters: Please read my question fully :) –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:13
18  
Please don't confuse popularity (votes) with suitability to the Stack Overflow model. Just because something receives a lot of votes doesn't make it auto-worthy of extra protection. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 21 at 14:13
    
@MartijnPieters: "It is not enough to explain the site rules somewhere because it's not obvious to everyone how the site rules apply to such questions." –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:13
2  
That's what we have Meta for. You can come here and ask for clarifications. Let's not complicate the system more, shall we? –  Martijn Pieters Apr 21 at 14:14
    
@MartijnPieters: Okay. This is what I'm doing. Have I made a mistake with using meta? Is there a reason why my question is being downvoted? –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:14
3  
See the faq; votes on Meta are different from the regular Stack Exchange websites. You posted a feature-request, people disagree with the request. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 21 at 14:15
    
@MartijnPieters: Ah, ok. –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:15
    
A moderator did not delete it, contrary to your statement above, he merely closed it. –  Servy Apr 21 at 14:17
1  
@servy: That paragraph is talking about a deleted comment. Comments are deleted not closed, right? –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:22
1  
@NeilG Just to put your mind as ease the "heavily upvoted comment" was flagged by another user as not constructive. During the review of the flags the comment was deleted. Comments are also considered an after-thought and you shouldn't expect them to stick around permanently even if they are upvoted. –  bluefeet Apr 21 at 14:26
1  
@NeilG I understand where you're coming from -- but that's not particularly practical. We delete thousands of comments a day; if we left a comment every time we deleted a horde of not-constructive comments, we'd have no time to actually moderate the site. –  George Stocker Apr 21 at 14:30
1  
@NeilG The best way to keep us accountable is to bring up issues on meta. One particular thing I like is to make all moderator actions public. (I think I suggested it on meta a few years ago). I think all moderator actions should be public. I'm ok with that. I also think All user moderation type action should be public. Any user: re-open? Public. Close? public. Vote to delete? Public. Vote to undelete? Public. –  George Stocker Apr 21 at 14:38
3  
@NeilG I don't think you truly understand how much work the mods do and adding a comment to everything would increase that substantially. If you have an issue with the moderating of the site you should bring it to meta. –  bluefeet Apr 21 at 14:40
1  

1 Answer 1

Oddly enough, I'm the moderator that closed your question (I happened upon it because I was doing Python work at the time).

Your question was closed because it's not a good fit for Stack Overflow. This has nothing to do with whether or not it's a popular or good question. A question being open indicates it's a good fit for Stack Overflow, a question having votes indicates it's a popular (or good) question. Those two states are orthogonal to each other.

It's a great question. Let's get that out of the way.

But, what would the end state to such a question look like? How would we determine an objectively correct answer?

You could potentially have dozens of answers, each with a different advantage and disadvantage. Which answer would be objectively correct?

Stack Overflow doesn't do well when the answers are based on "In my Opinion", nor does it do well when there's just a list of things. Part of the utility in a Stack Overflow question is that it is easily googleable, and that it solves a problem the googler has. In this case, "Advantages and Disadvantages" are not a problem. "I can't get Nose to run because X" is a problem.

Also, the question doesn't really have a good answer. It had two years to collect some good content, but it failed to do so in two years. That also means that there's not much to lose if the question is deleted.

If you want the question to stay around, put some effort in making the answer good enough that we wouldn't want the question deleted. As it stands, there's not really a reason to keep the question around.

To answer the rest of your rather bold questions:

Given the unique factual rather than discussional answer, would most people consider the question not to be constructive?

It's opinion based; and a point in time view of each library from one user's perspective. While parts of the answer are factually correct; other parts are that user's opinion.

What is the point of deleting questions versus closing them?

It's not really a 'vs' thing. It's closing can lead to deletion (not always, though).

We close questions because they are not a good fit for Stack Overflow (for a multitude of reasons).

We delete questions because they are not a good fit and they do not contain any content that we should keep around. Content that expands the useful repository of programmer knowledge.

Even if it's not what's happening, deleting comes across as eliminating a magnet for moderator criticism. How can that image be prevented?

Moderators delete questions. If we do something you think is incorrect, bring it up on Meta. In this case, although I could have deleted your question, I chose not to. I chose to leave that option to the community, because I don't think it's crystal clear that it should be deleted. In this case, I'm deferring to the community. Sometimes I don't, because of established practice. In this case I did.

That's normal for a community-elected moderator. We were elected to use our best judgement in carrying out moderator duties across Stack Overflow. We really are glorified janitors.

Should there be a requirement to explain why a particular question is voted to be closed or deleted if the question has a given number of upvotes?

I try really hard to leave comments when I close a question unilaterily. I try to go above and beyond. I don't always do this, and I haven't always done it. In this case, I chose not to, but I was also a 'young' moderator then. As far as a requirement, no there shouldn't. As I explained earlier, a questions votes have no bearing on whether it belongs on Stack Overflow.

share
2  
Not to mention that the answer is already outdated because both unittest and nose have evolved since then. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 21 at 14:32
    
Great point, Martijn! –  George Stocker Apr 21 at 14:32
    
@MartijnPieters: Actually, that's addressed in the comments to the answer. –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:34
    
@GeorgeStocker: Thanks for taking the time to answer my meta question. Would you be able to answer all of my (bolded) questions? –  Neil G Apr 21 at 14:36
1  
@NeilG: Exactly; comments are needed to keep the answer from becoming irrelevant altogether. But noone is maintaining the answer itself. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 21 at 14:37
    
@NeilG Done. I edited my answer to answer your bolded questions. –  George Stocker Apr 21 at 14:49

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .