I answered somebody's question. It was a new person who joined Stack Overflow today. He/she thanked me and said it works, but he/she hasn't accepted my answer.

The question is here for your reference: Update Table in Access.

Is it okay to send a comment telling him/her about how to accept answers, and maybe asking him/her to accept mine? Or should I just leave it, and maybe he/she will come back at some point in time?

I haven't been on Stack Overflow for long, so I too am a bit of a newbie and not sure about the etiquette.

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You'll find a lot of variants of this question in MSE, e.g.: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/88535/… –  Mat Apr 19 at 6:22
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Thank you... see how "newbie" I am? I didn't know about meta.stackexchange... Although now I realize meta.stackoverflow is brand new...By the way, should I delete my question or do anything with it now that you pointed me to answers in meta.stackexchange? –  AleAssis Apr 19 at 6:51
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You don't need to do anything with this question, it's a legitimate question that hasn't been answered here yet AFAIK. Just wait a bit, I'm sure someone will share their view on this here, specifically in the context of Stack Overflow. (I'm too lazy to do that :-) ) –  Mat Apr 19 at 7:00
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Welcome to my world. Only about 10% of my answers are accepted on the tags I'm active on. I'm a well known expert in the subject with a 30K rating and it all comes from up votes because I'm always getting newbies who ask a question and then never accept the answer. –  Christopher Painter Apr 21 at 0:08
    
@ChristopherPainter At least you got a badge out of it? –  jpmc26 Apr 21 at 22:28
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@AleAssis Don't forget to accept one of the answers here ;) ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 22 at 9:23
    
What exactly is it that you (and maybe other people) dislike in an answer not being accepted? –  PlasmaHH Apr 23 at 15:29
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I don't think there's anything wrong with it, but I'll note that it looks pretty pathetic to me. I've never seen it done in a way that didn't sound like reputation begging and it always makes me feel a little dirty and sad. –  lwburk Apr 23 at 15:33
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Oh the Irony that his answer has been accepted on the original thread yet this remains "Unanswered". This has made my day! –  CaRDiaK Apr 23 at 15:54
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I wish there was a "flag for acceptance" option for those times when the user has clearly accepted the answer by commenting. –  Matheus Moreira Apr 24 at 12:14
    
Nevermind, my impression was obviously wrong. I can unmark an accepted answer and choose another later. –  Wes Modes Apr 24 at 18:04
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I hope I am not the only one seeing the irony in the fact that this question was asked a week ago and there still isn't an accepted answer. –  scott.korin Apr 27 at 15:53
    
@scott.korin many months later...same irony –  charlietfl Jul 27 at 22:16

8 Answers 8

If a new user has never accepted an answer before and has thanked you for your answer it is acceptable to point them to the functionality. I normally would write something like:

Hi @user12345 if this or any answer has solved your question please consider accepting it by clicking the check-mark. This indicates to the wider community that you've found a solution and gives some reputation to both the answerer and yourself. There is no obligation to do this.

(original markdown):

Hi @user12345 if this or any answer has solved your question please consider [accepting it](http://meta.stackexchange.com/q/5234/179419) by clicking the check-mark. This indicates to the wider community that you've found a solution and gives some reputation to both the answerer and yourself. There is no obligation to do this.

If the user has ever accepted an answer before or has been around for any amount of time then they're aware of how the system works. If you comment in this situation then it would normally appear as though you are either begging for reputation or pressurising a lower reputation user into accepting your answer - neither of which the community looks too kindly upon.

tl;dr

It's okay. Once.

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nitpick: The checkmark isn't green when not checked... –  rene Apr 19 at 7:49
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Sorted @rene :-). –  Ben Apr 19 at 8:19
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How about "Did you find my answer helpful, or do you need more help?" for low-reputation users who seem to have abandoned the question? –  bjb568 Apr 19 at 17:40
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To be honest I wouldn't use the word "my" @bjb568. If you're going down that route I'd write something like "hi @ user12345, have the answers you've got fully answered your question? If they have [comment above] or if not can you edit your question to clarify why they haven't and include any missing information." –  Ben Apr 19 at 22:34
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This one-time limit would be reasonable if humans were robots, and you only needed to teach them something once for them to master the concept. Humans aren't robots. They often need to be instructed, and reminded multiple times. Human programmers also juggle accounts on multiple programmer Q+A/forum sites. Each may have different etiquette/rules. Just because they got it right once, doesn't mean they won't lapse into their other forum habits. If a programmer doesn't have a thick enough skin to handle a little nagging, my God, they're going to get killed in code reviews. –  Nate Apr 22 at 7:20
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But that's part of the problem @Nate; what are you nagging about? You're nagging for someone to give you a little bit of rep. The one-time thing isn't much to do with the question asker, it's to protect the community and the question answerer –  Ben Apr 22 at 7:36
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What about answers to questions where the users are now inactive? I've got one that I'd get an additional badge for but the user has been inactive for so long and never rewarded me with a tick, despite the fact it answers the question and is voted significantly higher than all other answers :( –  Ian Apr 23 at 15:16
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@Ben You're not only nagging for rep. Marking a question as accepted also helps others that come across the question later. So while it might be self serving, it has other benefits. –  mason Apr 23 at 20:53
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It might have other benefits @mason. There's no particular reason why the OP has more knowledge about the subject than the community and there are plenty of cases of completely wrong accepted answers. If I come across an answer to a question I'd normally try the one with the highest number of votes first. –  Ben Apr 23 at 20:55
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Would be awesome to have to ask AleAssis to accept the answer that worked for him :D –  mgarciaisaia Apr 24 at 18:15
    
I kinda think AleAssis left this answer not-accepted intentionally.. –  JoYSword Jul 28 at 16:21
    
I agree with this answer but not on the part where you say [the user] has been around for any amount of time. There are many users that register, ask a question, grab the answer and then disapper. They reappears after a long time (months, years?) ask a new question and leave agein. So the time parameter should not be considered if they have never accepted an answer. –  Steve Oct 25 at 9:37
    
If that's the case they haven't been "around" @Steve, they've been elsewhere... You could have a good guess from their act try as to which is is. –  Ben Oct 25 at 9:39
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The problem is that I don't know a method to discover if a user has been around or not. I could talk of active users or lurkers (no offense intended) In any case I personally don't look at the seniority of registration but only to the fact that they never accepted answers or are new users. So I say: Since you are a new user (or Since you are not a very active user) of this site I recommend to read [How To Accept Answers] .... then I could continue with your proposed comment –  Steve Oct 25 at 9:59

I sometimes use standard verbiage to encourage a new user to accept an answer. I use it very sparingly (these days) when I'm one contender among several, but will definitely use it when there's a 'Thanks' comment on someone else's answer and no acceptance, and sometimes when mine is the only answer.

If the advice has been followed, or is now moot because the user is not registered on Stack Overflow, or hasn't been seen for several years (yes, I mean years!) then I'll remove the comment when I next spot it.

Formatted:

Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please note that the preferred way of saying 'thanks' around here is by up-voting good questions and helpful answers (once you have enough reputation to do so), and by accepting the most helpful answer to any question you ask (which also gives you a small boost to your reputation). Please see the [About] page and also How do I ask questions here?

In a comment, the [About] becomes a link.

Raw Markup:

Welcome to Stack Overflow.
Please note that the preferred way of saying 'thanks' around here is by
up-voting good questions and helpful answers (once you have enough
reputation to do so), and by accepting the most helpful answer to any
question you ask (which also gives you a small boost to your
reputation).
Please see the [About] page and also [How do I ask questions
here?](http://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask)
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In general, yes, you can post something. How exactly you word it depends on the asker.

For an inexperienced asker (based primarily on reputation, number of questions/answers, etc.), it is good etiquette to explain how to accept an answer and remind them to do so, always with the qualifier of "if it answers your question." If there are many answers, you might consider commenting on the question itself and wording it to encourage them to accept an answer, rather than yours.

If the user is more experienced, a different approach is required as they already know all this. Chances are they just forgot to accept an answer. In this case, I start by waiting a while. A couple days, usually. After some time has passed, I ask if one of the proposed answers sufficiently answers their question or if they still have a problem. I usually also ask for them to provide some clarification or to elaborate if the answers don't work for them. This kind of comment serves a triple purpose: 1) It reminds them to accept an answer, without being rude. 2) It asks if any of the answers work, which is useful information for anyone else viewing the question. 3) It prompts them to provide additional details if the answers don't work, giving everyone who answered a chance to revise their answers or for the OP to post their own answer if they figured it out on their own. This all works toward one end goal: providing a full answer to the question that is clearly marked for other users having a similar problem. I have yet to have anyone respond negatively to such a comment.

In short: You can generally find some polite way of addressing the lack of an accepted answer in a comment. Don't be pushy. Assume the OP knows what they're doing, unless it is clearly a new user. If it's clearly a new user, you can provide brief instructions on how the site works.

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If I answer a question and the OP never accepts any answer, I usually just don't do anything. However, if I come across a question that:

  1. Was asked some time ago, and
  2. I did not place an answer on, and
  3. Has an answer that does address the problem

Then, I leave a comment reminding the asker to accept an answer and I might even hint that one of the given answers does address his issue.

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I have always said something, regardless of their status. What's the harm? Worst case they already know and just accept at a later time.

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It's rude, that's the harm. –  Servy Apr 22 at 19:59
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@Servy lol, I didn't know people had such touchy feelings on here –  FastTrack Apr 23 at 12:36
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It's rude, and sometimes will get your answer downvotes from those who think so - especially if the badgering-for-accept is posted quickly (or even in the answer itself) or on an answer with isn't of very high quality to begin with. –  Chris Stratton Apr 24 at 20:55

I always point new users to this if they do not accept an answer of mine on which they commented it solved their problem.

I do this by pointing to the fact accepting an answer indicates the question is resolved and that the chosen answer is validated as working. Hence, you won't be wasting the time of people who are:

  1. Looking to answer unresolved questions
  2. Looking for validated answers

It makes it more difficult to look for good questions and answers when they're not marked as accepted, so I try to explain this to new users. Something along the lines of:

Glad the solution worked. Would you mind accepting this answer? It might help people experiencing a similar issue and will help getting your question noticed. For more information, take a look at our FAQ. Thanks and welcome to SO!

Original mark down:

Glad the solution worked. Would you mind accepting this answer? It might help people
experiencing a similar issue and will help getting your question noticed. For more
information, take a look at our [FAQ](http://stackoverflow.com/help/accepted-answer). Thanks and welcome to SO!

I agree you should comment in sucha way on experienced users, they know how the system works (hopefully (:) and spamming these comments will make you look like you're begging for reputation.

There's one exception though, and that is users with low accept rate. To me, it makes perfectly sense to keep on trying to educate them. You don't even have to do this for your own answers, if you spot an unresolved question, which has an answer that should be the accepted one, simply point this out to the OP.

Avoid spamming these comments, if someone's not willing, it simply won't happen.

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I'm not sure about this comment... why your answer and not anyone else's? Acceptance also won't help people with a similar issues, your answer will do that. It won't help with getting the question noticed either - and this is beside the point for someone who's just got a working answer. –  Ben Apr 22 at 9:45
    
I only ever add it when the OP indicated (in comments) it helped him/her with his/her problem. I'm not spamming this around on every answer I provide :). Acceptance indicates very clearly the question was resolved. I'm not saying acceptance is always a measure for a good quality answer (there are countless examples out there), I just know when I'm looking for answers my first focus will be on questions that have an accepted answer. –  Anzeo Apr 22 at 11:48

I feel like there's something wrong with asking someone to accept your answer. That seems a bit pretentious.

I think its OK to ask them to accept some answer. Stack Overflow is a Q&A site, not a Q site.

I've even been in situations where I land on Stack Overflow in an unfamiliar area and I have to ask "what's wrong with Answer X since you did not accept it (or any others). It seems OK to me, but I don't know the technology".

You can also cite How does accepting an answer work?. I often do it to nudge a new user and help him/her learn how to use the site.

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You can definitely do something like that. The user may simply be unaware of SO guidelines and/or etiquette. A fundamental assumption that you as the answer-giver have to work with though is that there are some people who:

  1. Have a problem
  2. Sign up for SO
  3. Ask their question
  4. Get their answer
  5. Leave without ever being heard from again or sign up for a new account when they have a new problem.

That is part of the "risk" of using you time to answer a question. There is no mechanism for the community or moderators (that I am aware of) to retroactively assign best answers based upon this scenario.

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There is no mechanism, no. It's been rejected multiple (read hundreds) of times. Acceptance doesn't even indicate that an answer is the "best"; that's what your votes are for (and why they're so important). Acceptance only indicates that this was the answer which helped the OP the most. –  Ben Apr 21 at 18:04

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