The language Processing is based very heavily off of Java. In fact, Processing is actually basically a combination of a library and an IDE that converts code snippets into applets. The syntax is exactly the same, except that code doesn't necessarily need to be in a class.

Most Processing questions are also tagged with . Should they?

In my opinion, Processing questions that could be solved by a Java expert with no experience in Processing should be tagged with as well as , but otherwise they should only be tagged with .

Example: Multiple keyboard responses/functions probably does not benefit from the java tag. Anyone who found that question because of the java tag but not because of the processing tag would most likely not be able to help. This question, however, doesn't even theoretically need the processing tag. Without that tag, it would look exactly like a Java question, could be answered by someone who doesn't know Processing, and the questioner could use that answer to solve his question.

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I'm curious to know how many of the 1635 questions with that tag carry the tag to mean "This question is about processing <stuff being processed>." –  BoltClock Mar 27 at 16:00
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@BoltClock'saUnicorn I recently ran into a Python question that was "how do I make a class do ..." and sure enough it was tagged with make! So yeah... –  Louis Mar 27 at 16:09
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@Louis some people will try to type their subject line into the tags and see what sticks... even if it's not applicable. "How do I make my code copy a file?" --> make copy file –  MichaelT Mar 27 at 16:27

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

In my opinion, the rule should be as follows:

  • Is it a question specific to Processing's IDE? If so, but not .
  • Otherwise, it is a question about code:

The thing about Processing is that it actually consists of two components: An API in the form of some JARs (you can compile processing applications in, e.g., Eclipse), and an IDE that drops your sketch code nearly unaltered into a Java source file then compiles as usual.

I believe questions about code should also be tagged with for the same reasons that, e.g., should also be tagged with -- essentially you're programming in Java but using some specific API.

The benefits of adding the are great; in many cases, Processing questions can be solved by the general Java community, especially when related to general logic, syntax, etc. There is nothing Java that does not apply to Processing.

This is, of course, ignoring questions incorrectly tagged with the word "processing" because the OP is just processing something. But that is generally irrelevant here.

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What about this? Can it "be solved by the general Java community"? –  The Guy with The Elf Hat Mar 27 at 16:08
    
@TheGuywithTheHat No, but your question is not the right question. That question, Processing or not, is too broad. Both with and without Processing, there is not enough context to give a correct concrete answer. Note also that answers given were specific to "Swing", not general "Java"; so it's not exactly a perfect comparison. –  Jason C Mar 27 at 16:14
    
And in any case, that is similar to asking a question like "How do I read an object from a database?" and tagging it "hibernate", then arguing that it should not be tagged "Java" because non-hibernate answers were being given. –  Jason C Mar 27 at 16:15
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Basically, Java is a language. Processing is not. Processing is an API and an IDE. We generally always give API questions their language tags as well. The problem with Processing is that it is an odd case of also including an IDE (and so IDE questions are not distinguishable from code questions using tags alone) with a minimal preprocessor that dumps your code into a Java source file (thus a general feeling that Processing is a language separate from Java). –  Jason C Mar 27 at 16:19

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