I am an experienced Java programmer and I recently started learning Python, and wanted to know what is a good set of development tools for Python. A quick Google search brought me to this question on Stack Overflow - What IDE to use for Python?. This thread has a lot of useful information and gave me a good sense of what several developers like and use. Unfortunately it was locked 2 years ago in 2010, so maybe it is outdated?

I find this situation a bit unfortunate because, such opinions/recommendations are quite useful especially when you are a beginner. When such recommendations are made on Stack Overflow you can also get a sense of credibility because you can see who made that recommendation, and also how did the extremely smart Stack Overflow community respond to it via up-votes and/or comments.

Maybe we can be a bit liberal on what sort of questions are allowed on Stack Overflow. I imagine one of the concerns is that people can get into heated arguments, but maybe the solution should be to keep such people in check (by blocking them? or something like that) rather than not even discuss a topic.

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Questions with subjective answers? You don't happen to mean subjective questions, do you? –  BoltClock's a Unicorn Sep 21 '12 at 4:46
    
Ok, subjectivity in questions and answers :-) –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 4:57
    
Okay, quick point. Which is the correct answer in that question? What can you not also find out from a Google search? IMHO, a question where the OP has to plead for help in order to keep it updated cannot be good. –  ben is uǝq backwards Sep 21 '12 at 5:04
    
It is a lot of good feedback. Developers mention why they like a particular ide/tool, what works there and what doesn't. Honestly, I did not find such a good compilation of options available and their merits and demerits elsewhere. FWIW, locked or not, stackoverlow questions are on top of Google results. –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 5:30
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I first found SO when I was looking for answers to a "what's a good ide for... " question. I too found it frustrating that the page was out of date, but was delighted with the detail and range of options and advantages. It's definitely subjective, and perhaps belongs on programmers, not SO, but isn't SE capable of editing away any wars and leaving the experience/wisdom? –  AndrewC Sep 21 '12 at 6:11
    
The rubric as it is, is still not ideal and a better one (like en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_text_editors) requires the powers of a full-fledged wiki –  prusswan Sep 21 '12 at 7:09
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required reading: Good Subjective, Bad Subjective "...there you have it: the difference between a good subjective question and a bad subjective question — expressed as six simple guidelines. If you’re wondering if a particular subjective question is worthy, wonder no longer. Apply the six subjective question guidelines and see how it scores..." –  gnat Sep 21 '12 at 7:26
    
Thanks for that link! The way I see it the 'best python ide' thread scores at least 4 out of 6 (points 2,3,4,6), yet the thread is closed now. –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 13:31
    
@DeepakAzad Those guidelines apply to those sites on the SE network which allow subjective questions. That is most of them, but not SO. It could be a fit for programmers, but even good subjective questions don't really belong on SO. –  Servy Sep 21 '12 at 15:17
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@DeepakAzad points 2,3,4,6? c'mon! "If you can just give the name... that will be enough" this wipes out point 2 (long answers) and 6 (no GTKY) in a heartbeat. "just vote for it" kills point 4 (experience over opinions). Of your list, only point 3 remains, making total score pretty miserable –  gnat Sep 21 '12 at 19:19
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2 Answers

Maybe we can be a bit liberal on what sort of questions are allowed on Stack Overflow.

No, we can't.

Preventing bad questions, closing them when appropriate, is exactly why a lot of us are even on Stack Overflow. I don't want to see a bunch of "What tool should I use for X" 'questions' that are nothing more than discussions. Once we start allowing those things, rather than quickly closing them, we start to lose what makes SO special.

Stack Overflow is not a forum; it is a Q&A site. And sometimes that means that certain information, no matter how useful, does not belong here.

When such recommendations are made on Stack Overflow you can also get a sense of credibility because you can see who made that recommendation, and also how did the extremely smart Stack Overflow community respond to it via up-votes and/or comments.

And that's exactly why we don't want it: it makes people think that particular results are "credible" based on upvotes and such.

Voting on an opinion-based topic is based on, well, opinions. Emacs would get upvotes based on the number of people who like and use Emacs. VI would get upvotes based on the number of people who are masochistsenjoy the pleasures of VI. And so on. It's a popularity contest; "credibility" doesn't enter into it.

But because objective voting is supposed to be credible, by applying it to subjective material, it lends voting patterns an air of legitimacy. A false air of legitimacy.

We don't want to do that.

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You get to see the profile of the person who has written an answer and/or a comment -- that's what makes it credible (at least for me). Yes, votes is mostly a measure of popularity because you do not see who voted for what. –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 19:49
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The question and answers are definitely not that outdated since it's a community wiki and people are free to modify the existing content. (just sort by active)

The real problem is that like questions of such nature, you will have to try out all the 10+ options yourself, and find out what suits you best. There are just too many options and vote counts don't really matter (if you are not using Vim and find its commands to be so awkward as compared to your usual editors, having 1000 votes isn't going to change anything)

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The description at the bottom of question says - 'This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed', so I thought it is outdated. –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 5:27
    
Well.. at the very least I see what are the options available and what are their merits and demerits from actual users. –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 5:33
    
My experience tells me this is highly personal, I will still have to narrow the list down to tools that are still current and popular on my system and suits my habits, which is all fairly time consuming. A Q&A like that is not helpful in this regard, and SO has no interest in maintaining highly organized and detailed tool rubrics. –  prusswan Sep 21 '12 at 5:38
    
Sure it is personal and sure there are options, but at least the detailed information available helps you to find the right toolset. The alternative is to not have any information at all, which means you are lurking around in the dark. –  Deepak Azad Sep 21 '12 at 7:00
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There is a reason why they call this place a Q&A site, and not Wikipedia. –  prusswan Sep 21 '12 at 7:07
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