Seems to me the "Vote Up" privilege is fine to be available only to users who have a little bit of reputation (asked and answered a few questions perhaps).

Further, it's fine to make that visible and obvious to new users, so they can be encouraged to participate.

However, when a new user attempts to up vote a question or answer, they get a big red box that reads:

Vote Up requires 15 Reputation

(click to dismiss)

Instead, can't a more positive mode of participation be given, by using green, or some other positive color, and changing the verbage such as:

Vote Up requires 15 Reputation

Consider [link]Finding this useful[/link]

and [link]Gaining more Reputation[/link]

I was discouraged for a long time from participating because it seemed to me that reputation was hard-earned and I couldn't do it. I'm barely starting now, and on a place like stackoverflow, it is hard to ask new questions, or answer the ones that aren't answered immediately.

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What in particular would that message link to? And 15 rep isn't all that big of a hurdle really. –  Bart Sep 19 '12 at 20:28
    
And before you assume that people think your question is bad, please read meta.stackoverflow.com/faq#vote-differences –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '12 at 22:04
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Isn't it orange? That's not red. –  minitech Sep 20 '12 at 2:24
    
@Bart The message would link to the "Find this useful?" question which logged-out users can use. Also 15 rep can be a big hurdle simply for providing useful information, and there are a lot of folks who just read SO and never post, so one might hypothesize about exactly why that is (for better or worse). –  Matt Senate Oct 16 '12 at 0:02
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1 Answer

I really don't see the point.

Instead, can't a more positive mode of participation be given, by using green, or some other positive color

This is a bit of a contradiction. Red normally means stop / no, green the opposite 1. It might be quite confusing for people if this were reversed. I'm certain I wouldn't like to be told I can't do something with a green box. I would immediately associate this with success, which would be wrong.

The benefit of red is that it's immediately associated with failure which increases the chances that someone will actually read the words on there, as you did. You then knew what you had to do in order to be able to perform the action you'd just attempted.

There might be a place to make the verbiage less terse but you're going to have to suggest something that'll:

  • Fit into a little box
  • Actually mean something. Don't forget that this is something that has to easily and quickly convey its meaning to a wide audience from all over the planet.

I was discouraged for a long time from participating because it seemed to me that reputation was hard-earned and I couldn't do it. I'm barely starting now, and on a place like stackoverflow, it is hard to ask new questions, or answer the ones that aren't answered immediately.

Really? You've been a member for 1 day. You have 18 reputation having asked only one question and answered a different one. I really don't see how it is that difficult or how this fits into your previous point.

As you've only been a member for a day you've only had opportunity to experience this for one day. You rose to the challenge; well done!

1. I'm sure there are places this isn't true.

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"Really? You've been a member for 1 day." - I would assume he's been a lurker for much longer than the 1 day that he's actually been a member... –  FoamyGuy Sep 20 '12 at 0:08
    
Quite possibly, but the OP would have seen a popup asking him to log in if they weren't registered; so this doesn't really have a bearing on the first half of the question. The actuality of the OPs experience is different to that stated in the question. –  ben is uǝq backwards Sep 20 '12 at 8:20
    
Indeed, I have been a lurker for quite some time. As for the color green, sure, how about something other than green that is not red? The critique here is my post has a flaw of omission, in other words, the proper solution. This is a difficult question. I don't think there is an obvious solution. But I point to solutions like the "fail whale" of Twitter, where there is a concerted design effort to evoke empathy with users. I simply believe the format of providing feedback on SO questions could be more empathetic to the benefit of newbs. –  Matt Senate Oct 15 '12 at 23:54
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