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Multiple accepted answers System

Yes, the purpose of of SE sites is to find focused answers to focused questions, but the fact of the matter is sometimes a vague question will lead to several very helpful responses. Example:

Faye vs. Socket.IO (and Juggernaut)

It would be nice if a question could be put into a different "mode" where now it's a little bit more of a discussion. I realize that SE doesn't want to turn into a forum site... but there is a good chunk of quality content on the sites that is being unnaturally squeezed into the "best answer" model.

OR maybe the better solution is: if multiple people could collaborate on an answer.

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It's been decided that any question that doesn't fit into the "best answer" model is off topic. There is no way a feature will be added to facilitate that type of question. –  agf Nov 2 '11 at 0:37
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marked as duplicate by random Nov 2 '11 at 1:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Lance already mentioned this, but I wanted to expand upon it. Community Wiki answers are the best way to collaborate on a solution, as explained in this blog post:

The intent of community wiki in answers is to help share the burden of solving a question. An incomplete “seed” answer is a stepping stone to a complete solution with help from others; an incomplete question is a hindrance and an obstacle to getting a solution as no one understands the inquiry. It is in answers that the goal of community wiki, for the community, by the community, shows its truest colors.

Yet even in answers, true collaboration is scarce. Most of the time, a single individual can provide a complete answer. There are even times where a question looks like it’ll need a massive effort, but one gallant user steps up to the plate with an impressive and comprehensive answer.

Note, however, that Community Wiki should usually be used sparingly.

Most of the time, you should be asking yourself "How can I improve this post so that community wiki isn’t needed?" Community wiki is like a cheese knife: it is a specialized tool to be used sparingly.

Community wiki is for that rare gem of a post that needs true community collaboration. That’s when community wiki shines. If your site is teeming with community wiki posts — particularly in questions — you should consider the above points carefully.

In other words, you can use Community Wiki answers in those rare cases where the contributions of more than one person are needed to adequately address a question. However, if you want to ask a question that is open-ended and hypothetical or for which every answer is equally valid—as explained in the FAQ—I'm afraid that Stack Overflow isn't the right place to do so.

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Referring to your title, upvote all multiple correct answers.

Referring to the last phrase:

If multiple people could collaborate on an answer

you can do this with the Community Wiki feature, or people can just do suggested edits.

As far as the different "mode", you'll probably need to flesh out an exact approach, and make a separate question for it.

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I think no matter how he phrases it, he's asking for a way to ask poll / discussion questions, which is not going to get anywhere. –  agf Nov 2 '11 at 0:36
    
@agf, yeah you're probably right, he threw me off with his title, which seemed like a 'multiple accept' type FR. –  Lance Roberts Nov 2 '11 at 0:43
    
@afg i am not looking for a poll / discussion, I even explicitly mentioned how it would be bad to replicate forum functionality... –  John Bachir Nov 2 '11 at 4:03
    
@John, ok, then you probably need to really flesh out the functionality you'd like, and present it as a cohesive package. –  Lance Roberts Nov 2 '11 at 4:05
    
I think i want community wiki, but with more oomph. Like i want to select 2 answers and say "you two people, work together to form the perfect answer!" –  John Bachir Nov 2 '11 at 4:09
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