The CC-Wiki license makes use of the term "the author."

When Bob makes a post, it's obvious Bob "owns" the content, but what happens when he checks the Community Wiki button? Does it become the property of the Stack Overflow community? Even if Bob is the only one to have edited it?

Say I were to use a Community Wiki answer for something or other — say, in a book — who would I attribute the content to?

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Say I were to use a Community Wiki answer for something or other - say, in a book - who would I attribute?

Since you can see the edit history, I would look over that and make a judgment call on what 1 person or many people to credit.

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I like Ólafur's suggestion. At some point I wonder if attribution to the person is really necessary or if just attributing the site is sufficient. For example, if you cited a wikipedia article, it's likely you wouldn't also cite the 300 contributors to the article. StackOverflow has a lot less traffic on each question though, so you're certain to be able to find at least one main contributor.

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I think that was Kip's suggestion - but, I agree with your Wikipedia analogy, you wouldn't credit every contributor to an article there, so SO's wiki shouldn't be different.. but, the difference is the community-wiki'ing might happen simply because the question was popular (>30 answers).. Maybe credit the user if their contribution is 100%, and credit SO if more than one user contributes? –  dbr Jun 30 '09 at 15:09
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Couldn't you just credit StackOverflow and include the URL?

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Everyone is the author for their part. (This probably means you must indeed credit everyone who did significant (in the copyright law sense) edits to the portions you reused.)

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